“Purim Spiel” newsletter out!

A couple years ago, I wrote about my Purim newsletter in Tablet. It’s been a family tradition for years, but last year, I didn’t publish our usual f”Purim Spiel” paper. I couldn’t really see the humor in anything (I learned of my father’s death a week before the holiday).

This year we’re back. I can’t even tell if it’s funny anymore, because I’ve been working on it too much. Click here to read it: Purim Spiel 5776.

Note that the second page is first in the PDF. Feel free to print it out and read it that way. And, please, if you share, give the Klempner family credit!

Happy Purim!

 

New wacky Passover poetry

I’m not going to have much time to post in length before Pesach hits next week, but I’m going to try to share something small every day to make up for it.

So here’s your tiny morsel of Passover-related kookiness for today:

(throat-clearing)

You cleansed the windows of mud

And you scrubbed all the toys in your tub

But you still won’t be through

When Pesach is due

If you don’t clean chometz off the rug.

 

Free writing tip…don’t be afraid to write bad poetry. And if you’d like to share your own corny/hammy/couldn’t-hechsher-if-it-tried Pesach poetry, just add it in the comments.

Time to be funny! Turn things upside down! It’s really Adar this time. I promise.

Okay, so for those who have no idea what the title of today’s post means, I’ll clarify:

Don't you wanna dress up for Purim?

Don’t you wanna dress up for Purim?

The Hebrew month of Adar contains the wacky holiday of Purim. The thing is, when there’s a leap year, there’s an entire extra month of Adar–because if you’re going to have a month that comes twice, it might as well as be the one that’s known as the happiest of the year. But there’s only Purim in the second Adar.

After a month of tolerating a giant “SIKE!” the second Adar of 5774 started yesterday. Jewish kids everywhere are going crazy. Continue reading

Pesach Limericks for Maggid (because I need a break from my kitchen right now)

pyramid of giza, exodus

On the way outta there!

Many of us have memories of childhood seders. Even when the memories are fond ones (like these shared recently by Jessica Soffer on the Prosen People blog), we were often confused by the Maggid section of the Haggadah. I’ve pried myself from the kitchen to share some wacky Passover poetry to read a the seder during Maggid, hoping it’ll help.

Chag kasher v’sameach, chaverim! (“Have a kosher and joyous holiday, friends!”) Continue reading